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Comments

Stuart Bradley

I think the guy's living in a different France to me! Our nearest communes are surviving very well indeed, thankyou very much! The géants are there if anyone wants to use them, I personally don't have the time to meander from store to store, as don't the majority of working French! The supermarkets offer ease and variety, as they do anywhere else. They also (especially in France) offer good quality and price!

Roy

Here in America, a lot of people complain about the huge Wal-Marts, Home Depots etc. pushing out the little stores. But the same people keep shopping there. I would love to shop in the little stores and support the little guys, but in reality, I struggle each week to feed myself & my girlfriend, so we have to save every penny we can. So yes, that mean shopping at whatever big store has the best prices. it's unfortunate, but that's is the way we have to live.

Gill

Hi
I dont really understand where Peter Miller is coming from. Yes, France is changing, but slowly. I have been holidaying in France since 1966 and now plan to relocate there. Yes, there are large supermarkets if you want them, and no huge queues at the checkout, yes, sometimes there maybe a fight for a place on a carpark, but come on, what do you think its like in the UK. Huge queues at the checkout ALWAYS, car parks that may or may not have a space, but PAY AND DISPLAY. In France I have never met any traffic jams unless in a large town, where can you go here without a major road hold up?(north of Scotland perhaps?)
I think Peter Miller wrote the article just because they couldn't fill the space with anything else, although I have to say, I enjoyed reading it if only to disagree with him,

Rich

Gill, which supermarket do you go to? It's something that I and my wife (she's French) have noticed about the UK is that the service is *always* quicker and the queues always shorter than in supermarkets in and around Calais. We always put it down to the employment laws making shops have less staff in France.

Greg

I agree Craig - while yes the small village grocery stores tend to be closing, it's downright degenerate not to buy your bread at your local bakery here. And surely globalization hasn't wiped out the snails and mushrooms in Musidan? The disappearance of small shops is a challenge, but anyone who says the real France is disappearing hasn't appreciated the real France. Every time the widow up the road stops and chats, every time the farmer down the hill waves at me, every time someone shares with us the produce of their potager, I'm reminded that it is very much alive and well. We all need to do our bit to keep it that way. Thanks for the reminder.

Craig McGinty

Hi Greg, as you say the small details of French life are sometimes forgotten, obviously it's not all fun and games and France has its problems, but people are sometimes quick to ignore what's going on all around them.
All the best, Craig

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