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m chekairi

i was watching a program on tv about french property, there was a mention of a daibetic clinic that helps people with type 2 daibetes to maintain a good health. it is situated somewhere in franch countryside. i would be gratfull if you can help me find it. thank you

Craig McGinty

Hi there, could be quite a challenge to track the hospital you mention without a little more info. However, as the article mentions the service available for those with diabetes seems to be good wherever you live in France.
All the best, Craig

Helen Coles

We moved to the Gers almost 5 years ago and one of the primary factors in making the move was due to the appalling care our 17 yr old diabetic daughter had received in Canterbury.

As the result of having spent several years being treated with the wrong mix of insulin,(by a consultant who was not a diabatologist)she ended up in excruciating pain with severe nerve damage in one foot, wheel chair bound and on the Middlsex Adolescent ward in London for months.

We were advised that she needed an insulin pump but the NHS would not provide this because we lived in Canterbury, had we lived in Maidstone, where she continued her treatment after leaving the Middlesex hospital, she would have received the pump on the NHS (she was at that time taking 5 injections of insulin a day and was completely unable to regain a balance in her blood sugar levels).

With six children and at the time only one income, it was obviously with some difficulty that we managed to finance this very vital piece of equipment and accessories.


She was studying for GCSE's but unable to attend school being older than 16 she could not even attend the local hospital school, she had already repeated a year of schooling,due to this appalling situation.We were told by health experts that if she did walk again she would never be able to live a normal life.

The one excellent piece of advice that we were offered was that she would do better in a warmer environment.As soon as she had successfully completed her GCSE's we left the UK.

On the first visit to the diabatologist here her pump was changed, This lady and her team were absolutely staggered by her condition when we arrived.
She was provided with a replacement pump and has all accessories provided on an on-going basis, completely free of charge!

The medical representative who arrived at our home to train us in the new use of the pump was amazed that I just couldn't stop thanking him (at that time we were paying an ongoing charge of approx. £1500 for tubings cannulas etc.We currently pay a fraction of this to cover the health insurance costs for the whole family, which includes the cover of prescription charges)

His comment,'It's normal, this is her health, nothing is more important.'

Within a year of being here following the superb care and attention that she has received she was off crutches, up and walking.

Within two years she was able to take part in regular sports lessons and after three years was actually taking part in 'Endurance'(the word says it all!)The care she still receives is second to none.

She is currently at Pau University studying law,she plays the flute with a 'Harmony'and plays the piccolo and dances the summer evening into the early hours of the day with the local bandas,she is also the secretary on the local 'committee of the fêtes,' When we arrived here her future looked bleak, not any more.

The health officials were right, she does not lead a normal life but an absolutely extraordinary one!

In Conclusion!

Any-one who has moved to France or is concerned about moving and having challenges related to diabetes of diabetic health care please feel free to contact me, I would be happy to be of any assistance I can.

Craig McGinty

Dear Helen, thank you very much for taking the time to pass on your experience of diabetic care in France.
All the best
Craig

Garry Kneale

Good Morning Helen Cole.
Thank you for the infomtion in you above email,i am considering moving to france.
I have been searching for infomation regards a french diabetic society, is there such a organisation.
Do you regeistar with a doctor as per uk,then he/she refers you to a diabetic clinic.
I am types 2 but will be moving to insulin with in the year.
I look forward to your advise.
regards
Garry

Craig McGinty

Hi Garry, many thanks for your message and as you suggest, registering with your local doctor is the first step.
From there you will be able to find out more about treatment in France.
All the best, Craig

Veronica Nicholas

My husband & I are considering moving to France after he retires next year.I am 58 years of age and I have recently been diagnosed with osteoporosis which is particularly severe in my lower spine. I continue to be physically active in my chosen sports i.e. table tennis, cycling & others. I would welcome any information regarding the healthcare and treatment of this condition I could expect to receive in France.I am, at present, taking prescribed medication to halt the loss of bone density.This has become an issue which may determine whether or not we move to France.

Veronica Nicholas

My previous comments were incorrectly under the heading of diabetes and should be under Osteoporosis

Yuhui

I will be coming to France Bordeaux following my husband in Feb 09 for 2 years. I am having Type 1 diabetes and my local Doctor in Asia asked me to find out if there is any hospital/association I can follow up with that can communicate in English because I do not know any French as yet.

Can anyone help me and advise?

Thank you.

Craig McGinty

Hi Yuhui, difficult to say for definite that your doctor will be able to speak English until you arrive, many do and most practices will do their level best to help patients.
The Association Française des Diabétiques website http://www.afd.asso.fr/ is the main resource in France and I am sure an email to them, even in English, will be answered.
Hope this helps, Craig

Yuhui

Thanks Alot Craig!

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